Our School by Sam Chaltain

Our School and How I Just Want To Hear What Happened

Jose Vilson Jose Leave a Comment

This is a quick blog recommending that you read Our School by Sam Chaltain. I’m in the throes of reading three edu-books in a row while promoting mine. What Chaltain provides in buckets is a first-hand account of what’s happening in two different, but clearly interesting schools in Washington, DC. In case you’re wondering, this isn’t a book review. For most of my educational career, I’ve mostly read books that already come …

Marvin Gaye singing

Adults, Please Get Out The Way [How Students Do It]

Jose Vilson Jose 2 Comments

This morning, I imagined Marvin Gaye would have a few things to say about what’s going on today: Today was supposed to be Michael Brown’s fourth day in college, getting acclimated with the ins and outs of college life, surely different than the humdrum K-12 bells. Sadly, he never got his chance at college and career readiness as the Ferguson police’s hands still smell of blood and tear gas. We …

Ferguson-Michael-Brown-690

When Can We Talk About Race? (Michael + Trayvon + Renisha + …)

Jose Vilson Jose 12 Comments

This is often the way education conversations go: Higher-Up: Hey, so what do people want to talk about? Teacher 1: Can we talk about teacher evaluation? Higher-Up: Sure, what’s on your mind? Teacher 1: Well, here it goes. [long diatribe about how great / terrible Danielson is] Higher-Up: Well, OK. Anyone else? Teacher 2 (of color): Can we talk about race now? Higher-Up: Sounds complicated. We need a more appropriate …

play-the-numbers-game

Who Taught Educators To Hate Themselves? (About Lists and Authenticity)

Jose Vilson Jose 6 Comments

The following is a debate I’ve had with a few folk, so here is an uninterrupted fleshing out of these thoughts. Michael Petrilli put out another list of edu-influentials this year. This list, unlike the last time I wrote about this, didn’t need any particular prodding from me regarding diversity and inclusion of women who discuss education policy. This list, unlike the last time, kept Sabrina, Audrey, and me, and …

FRAZIER DUI

Eduflack’s Review of This Is Not A Test, For Argument’s Sake

Jose Vilson Jose Leave a Comment

Today, Patrick Riccards of EduFlack wrote a review of my book This Is Not A Test, and it moved me in a major way. Read this excerpt: But most importantly, I walked away thinking I want someone like Vilson to be teaching my kiddos. This is a teacher who cares and a teacher who is making a difference each and every day he steps into his classroom. We may disagree …

summertime

Here It Is, A Profession Transformed

Jose Vilson Jose 3 Comments

I just got back from three packed-house events in Chicago, Chapel Hill, and Philadelphia in July. In each space, the energy in the room took me aback because I’m still not used to the idea that a bunch of folks with busy lives want to hear my mouth run for two hours. Yet, by thinking that I don’t belong on that stage or on that mic, I perpetuate the power …

donquixote1

Teachers of Color Caught In The Windmill (On Real Equity)

Jose Vilson Jose 4 Comments

  Last week, I delved a little deeper into this issue of teachers of color, hoping to sow some of the prevailing narratives up and construct something more cogent. Yet, when it comes down to it, the lack of teachers of color is a symptom and not a cause of the education gaps we currently see. Time and again, we get reports from former teachers of color about why they …

Digital Tools As The Gateway Drug To Real Pedagogy?

Jose Vilson Jose 5 Comments

On Sunday, I spent some time with the good folks at SMART Technologies (yeah, I can’t believe I’m saying that either, but more on that later) for the annual ISTE conference, a mega-large education conference hosted this year in Atlanta, GA. SMART Technologies asked me to give some words of wisdom to their partners around student collaboration, one of my personal passions. They neither asked me to restructure my remarks …

You Can’t Educate With Us (On Tone-Policing When Silent)

Jose Vilson Jose 3 Comments

I called someone a racist this past weekend. And a sexist for good measure. I don’t have much authoritative experience with the latter as I do the former, and I don’t go throwing around such a title lightly. I won’t go into the incident, but it was a long string of events that triggered me using the word, and, soon thereafter, people started opening up about some of the latent …