grammar Archives - The Jose Vilson

grammar

The Rock Says, "Do You Like Pi?"

The Rock Says, “Do You Like Pi?”

A few notes:

Quote of the Week:

Two things helped me break through. The first, being vouched for by someone in a position of power who had a relationship with someone else in a position of power. I met that person when costs of investment were low: I worked for David Carr at a rate of $100 dollars a week and ten cents a word for anything I published. The first summer I worked for him, I made $1,700. I did not consider myself underpaid. This was 1996. The New Republic had just told the world that black people had evolved to be stupid, and it seemed like every week they were saying something just as racist. I was at Howard University, surrounded by a community of brilliant black people, cut off from the Ivies. None of them had the contacts or the resources to reply. They just had to take it. I can’t tell you how much that angered me. I was made in that moment. And when I got my first break in writing, I didn’t think about being ripped off. I thought about whipping ass. I haven’t changed.

- Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Atlantic, on writing “for free”. Worth the full read.

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Ed Lover, C'Mon Son

Ed Lover, C'Mon Son

A few links:

  • This is probably the worst story I’d ever read. It’s too real to be a movie. [The Field Negro]
  • Here’s how one uses information design / aesthetics to tell 9/11. [Infosthetics]
  • If you ever had the urge to speak edubabble, check this handy tool passed onto me by Chad Ratliff. You can speak edubabble for the next 50 years. [Science Geek]
  • Funniest e-mail exchange, real or fake, I’ve read since I was in college? This one. [27b/6]

Lately, I’ve tried to live a peaceful, tranquil life. Lord knows I’ve only had too much drama personally and professionally with all of these misguided individuals, me amongst those. It’s in that spirit that I bring out my top 5 things irking me right now, with a little inspiration from Ed Lover, whose resurgence as a popular figure comes from his viral series entitled “C’Mon Son.” Here. We. Go.

#5: People Getting Far Too Personal on Social Networks

I’m alright with people having an affinity for the next person or respecting their work, but even the most “normal” of people catch a stan or two. If your whole existence on some social network is strictly replying and responding to one or two people, trying to get their attention and lauding them left and right, then c’mon son. For that matter, if the person finally replies, and then you reply back and they don’t response, don’t get Carrie-d away.

These hands! They tweet!

These hands! They tweet!

#4: People with Vanity Plates

If you’ve got a vanity plate, you need to do away with it a.s.a.p. That is so 20th century. Especially in a professional environment where there’s a chance that someone like me has to get on the loudspeaker and call your license plate, I’m going to spell the joint out thrice to let the world know. Just saying. C’mon son.

#3: Chris Brown

I haven’t said anything about “Breezy” because I was really waiting for all the details, like I needed any more evidence of his domestic abuse towards Rihanna than this. What’s worst still is the Chris Brown apologists out there who continue to defend him in the face of all this egregious act. While I don’t consider myself a judge and proprietor of right and wrong, I just think it’s much too soon for Chris to flood the airwaves with interviews talking about what he did and didn’t do when most of his interviews sound like contrived sound bites. I’m not hating; I wish him the best. But … c’mon son.

#2: People Trying To Correct My Grammar

I get it. I’m a math teacher, and a blogger, so superficially the standards for my writing should be pretty low. When I post something important, I should thus expect one person trying to tell me the difference between effect and affect. Only the problem is, I know the difference. And when I point it out, I use an online dictionary, like dictionary.com or something. I then should expect the person to break out Strunk & White’s The Elements of Style. Only that I have the book right above the computer I’m typing from. After pointing this out, I should then expect silence. C’mon son.

[p.s. - I don't mind if you're constructive about your criticism, but to try and look like the arbiter of the English language makes you look ... strunk up.]

#1: People’s Wack-Ass Writing

For the love of Christ, don’t send me your writing if it’s not even close to expressing any intelligible ideas. If I know kids in my 8th grade math class who have more imagination than you, then I’m not reading your writing. If everything you tweet has the words ‘soul,’ ‘life,’ ‘love,’ ‘peace,’ and other words that laminate your cred wherever you share your writing, then I’m not trying to read it. If I’ve read your metaphors somewhere before and it’s not an interesting twist, I’m not reading it.

As per my last annoyance, I’m not some grammar tyrant, but if you’re past high school and still don’t know where sentences start and end when writing an essay and it’s not ostensibly on purpose? … C’mon son.

Jose. C’mon son.

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